Oct 05, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2018-2019 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2018-2019 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
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    HON 101 Global Citizenship



    In this seminar, students will explore what it means to be a conscientious global citizen. In addition, students will identify and discuss global concerns and how different perspectives affect the development of policies for addressing these concerns. This course is one of three courses required for the completion of the College of Arts and Sciences Honors Program.  Credit(s): 1

  
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    HON 201 Serving Your Community



    This seminar will focus on identifying and discussing concerns and areas of need within the Winchester area. Throughout the seminar, students will discuss the benefits and challenges of community service and service-learning, as well as the role of effective group work and leadership in order to complete large-scale and/or complicated projects. This course is one of three courses required for the completion of the College of Arts and Sciences Honors Program. Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): Students must have completed at least one honors course prior to taking this course. 
  
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    HON 301 The Scholarship Process



    This seminar will focus on defining scholarship and exploring the process of scholarship within each student’s specific discipline. Students will discuss the similarities and differences between disciplines in relation to scholarship. Students will be expected to outline the requirements to complete a discipline specific scholarship activity and the role others must play in the project execution. This course is one of three courses required for completion of the College of Arts and Sciences Honors Program.  Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): Students must have completed at least two honors courses prior to taking this course
  
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    MUTC 423 Orchestration



    This course builds upon the principles and techniques of orchestral instrumentation to
    present a thorough survey of and practicum in the craft of orchestration for large
    ensembles. Credit(s): 2

    Prerequisite(s): MUTC-422
  
  •  

    WR 250 Fundamentals of Writing Practice



    This course will address the basic skills of professional writers in the corporate,
    creative and journalistic areas of writing practice. This class includes learning the
    digital specific modes of professional writing: e-publishing, multimodal and social
    media content. Students are expected to polish a number of assignments for the
    development of a final-year portfolio. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
  
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    WR 450 Writing Portfolio



    This course will develop the final writing portfolio for the Minor in Professional and
    Popular Writing. This portfolio will include samples of work demonstrating the
    student’s writing craft in multiple genres for diverse audiences, as well as reflective
    writing and a personal philosophy of writing practice. Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): WR 250

American Sign Language

  
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    ASL 101 Beginning American Sign Language I



    This course introduces the fundamentals of American Sign Language (ASL) used by the deaf community including basic vocabulary, syntax, fingerspelling, grammatical non-manual signals, expressive and receptive signing skills, and deaf culture. Students will also learn conversational/cultural behaviors necessary to hold a beginning-level conversation in ASL with deaf/hard-of-hearing native users of the language. Credit(s): 3

  
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    ASL 102 Beginning American Sign Language II



    This course is for students who have demonstrated competency in American Sign Language (ASL) through the first semester of university instruction. Students will continue to build their knowledge of the fundamentals of ASL used by the deaf community including vocabulary, syntax, fingerspelling, grammatical non-manual signals, expressive and receptive signing skills, and deaf culture. Students will also expand their knowledge of conversational/cultural behaviors necessary to hold a beginning-level conversation in ASL with deaf/hard-of-hearing native users of the language. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 101 
  
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    ASL 201 Intermediate American Sign Language I



    This course is for students who have demonstrated competency in American Sign Language (ASL) through the second semester of university instruction. Students will continue to develop vocabulary, conversational competence and grammatical knowledge within a total immersion approach. It introduces increasingly complex grammatical aspects including those unique to ASL, as well as incorporating sections on deaf culture and literature. Contact with the deaf community is encouraged to enhance linguistic and cultural knowledge. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 102 
  
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    ASL 202 Intermediate American Sign Language II



    This course is for students who have demonstrated competency in American Sign Language (ASL) through the third semester of university instruction. Students will continue to develop vocabulary, conversational competence and grammatical knowledge through the study of cultural and literary texts within a total immersion approach. Increasingly complex grammatical aspects including those unique to ASL will be studied and applied. Contact with the deaf community is encouraged to enhance linguistic and cultural knowledge. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 201 

Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 210 Introduction to Archaeology



    This course is an introduction to fieldwork in archeology including excavation, survey, analysis and laboratory processing. Anthropological theory as applied to material culture, New and Old World prehistory and the history of archaeology will also be covered. Students will receive training in all practical aspects of archaeology and an understanding of the concepts and ideas archaeologists utilize in interpreting both historic and prehistoric sites. Credit(s): 3

  
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    ANTH 213 Cultural Anthropology



    This course is a study concentrating on the principal aspects of human culture with emphasis on kinship, socialization of children, politics, art, religion, social control and the world-view. Credit(s): 3

  
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    ANTH 301 Human Ecology



    This course is designed to introduce students to the field of ecological anthropology and to help them gain an understanding of the complex and often competing relationships between social systems and ecosystems. Special emphasis is placed on human adaptation, the role of humans in the transformation of nature, threats from contemporary risks, and strategies of natural and cultural conservation including co-management of resources. Credit(s): 3

  
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    ANTH 420 Seminar in Intercultural Communication



    This course examines the relationship between culture and communication with an emphasis on theory and practical application in intercultural contexts. Ethnography and other approaches will be used to study interpersonal and public communication among people from different cultures. Credit(s): 3


Applied Class Piano

Applied Class Piano allows for group lessons in piano for students majoring in music or musical theatre, or students minoring in music, and are required to fulfill degree requirements as described in specific curriculum outlines. Open to students in other curricula as instructor time and studio space allow.

  
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    APCP 105 Basic Piano and Keyboard Harmony Skills I



    This course is designed especially for non-keyboard majors to fulfill basic piano requirements for all curricula. Included are scales, triad qualities and inversions, cadences, chord progressions, transposition, harmonization, scorereading, sight-reading and repertoire. Students must pass the final examination to pass the class. Credit(s): 1.5

  
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    APCP 106 Basic Piano and Keyboard Harmony Skills II



    This course builds upon keyboard skills developed in APCP 105 . Each category continues at a more advanced level. Credit(s): 1.5

    Prerequisite(s): APCP 105 
  
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    APCP 205 Basic Piano and Keyboard Harmony Skills III



    This course builds upon keyboard skills developed in APCP 106 . Each category continues at a more advanced level. Credit(s): 1.5

    Prerequisite(s): APCP 106 
  
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    APCP 206 Basic Piano and Keyboard Harmony Skills IV



    This course builds upon keyboard skills developed in APCP 205  and completes basic piano requirements through projects that call for skills directly related to possible professional needs. Student must pass the final examination to pass the course. Credit(s): 1.5

    Prerequisite(s): APCP 205 

Applied Elective Study

  

Applied elective lessons are open to students for non-curricular study as instructor time and studio space allow. Detailed course descriptions are obtained from the instructor at the first lesson or found in the handbook of the division offering the instruction. Must be approved by associate dean for undergraduate studies.

  
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    AE** 101 Applied****



    This course serves as an elective applied study for one half-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 1.5

  
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    AE** 102 Applied****



    This course serves as an elective applied study for one-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 3


Applied Major Study: Non-Preformance Music Curricula

  

3 credits (per semester)

Applied major lessons are individual lessons for students majoring in non-performance music curricula to fulfill degree requirements as described in specific curriculum outlines. Detailed course descriptions are obtained from the instructor at the first lesson or found in the handbook of the division offering the instruction.

  
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    AP** 102 Applied****



    This course serves as first-year applied major study for one-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Successful audition in area of study
  
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    AP** 202 Applied****



    This course serves as second-year applied major study for one-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Two semesters of study in this applied area
  
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    AP** 302 Applied****



    This course serves as third-year applied major study for one-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Four semesters of study in this applied area
  
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    AP** 402 Applied****



    This course serves as fourth-year applied major study for one-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Six semesters of study in this applied area

Applied Major Study: Performance Curricula

 

3 credits (per semester)

Applied major lessons are individual lessons for students majoring in performance curricula to fulfill degree requirements as described in specific curriculum outlines. Detailed course descriptions are obtained from the instructor at the first lesson or found in the handbook of the division offering the instruction.

  
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    AP** 103 Applied****



    This course serves as first-year applied major study for one-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Successful audition in area of study
  
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    AP** 203 Applied****



    This course serves as second-year applied major study for one-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Two semesters of study in this applied area
  
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    AP** 303 Applied****



    This course serves as third-year applied major study for one-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Four semesters of study in this applied area
  
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    AP** 403 Applied****



    This course serves as fourth-year applied major study for one-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Six semesters of study in this applied area

Applied Minor Study

 

1.5 credits (per semester)

Applied minor lessons are individual lessons for students to fulfill degree requirements as described in specific major or minor curriculum outlines. Open to students in other curricula if accepted into a Conservatory minor. Detailed course descriptions are obtained from the instructor at the first lesson or found in the handbook of the division offering the instruction.

  
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    AP** 101 Applied****



    This course serves as first-year applied minor study for one-half-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 1.5

    Prerequisite(s): Successful audition in area of study
  
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    AP** 201 Applied****



    This course serves as second-year applied minor study for one-half-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 1.5

    Prerequisite(s): Two semesters of study in this applied area
  
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    AP** 301 Applied****



    This course serves as third-year applied minor study for one-half-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 1.5

    Prerequisite(s): Four semesters of study in this applied area
  
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    AP** 401 Applied****



    This course serves as fourth-year applied minor study for one-half-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 1.5

    Prerequisite(s): Six semesters of study in this applied area

Applied Performance Development

Applied performance development is applied study in a specific instrument designed to expand knowledge of repertoire and performance practice in idioms as determined by the applied instructor.

  
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    APPD 101 Applied Performance Development



    This course serves as applied performance study for one half-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 1.5

  
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    APPD 201 Applied Performance Development



    This course serves as a continuation of APPD 101  for one half-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 1.5

  
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    APPD 301 Applied Performance Development



    This course serves as a continuation of APPD 201  for one half-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 1.5

  
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    APPD 401 Applied Performance Development



    This course serves as a continuation of APPD 301  for one half-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 1.5


Applied Recital Study

Applied recital study is designed to allow students to register for applied study if a recital is scheduled and curricular applied requirements have been met. Applied Recital Study carries an additional fee and may not be used to fulfill curricular requirements. Corequisite: registration for half or full recital.

  
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    APRS 401 Applied Recital Study



    This course serves as applied recital study for one half-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 1.5

  
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    APRS 402 Applied Recital Study



    This course serves as applied recital study for one hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 3

  
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    APRS 403 Applied Recital Study



    This course serves as applied recital study for one hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 3


Applied Teaching Techniques

Applied teaching techniques is the study of the pedagogical approaches related to a specific instrument, voice or area of applied study. Review of the sequential development of technique related to the performance medium is covered. Instruction includes review of etude and technical materials or appropriate physical exercises related to individual pedagogical approaches appropriate to specific stages, ages or grade levels from beginning through adult study, observation of students at various levels of technical development and observed introductory teaching experiences. The course includes preparation of an annotated bibliography of specific materials and an in-depth outline of specific courses of study with appropriate approaches and related etudes, solos, and supplementary material for each stage of development.

  
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    APTT 101 Applied Teaching Techniques



    This course serves as applied teaching technique study for one half-hour lesson per week. Credit(s): 1.5


Art

  
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    ART 101 Introduction to Drawing and Composition I



    This studio course is designed to develop basic observational and drawing skills and to expose students to various drawing materials and techniques. Credit(s): 2

  
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    ART 102 Introduction to Drawing and Composition II



    Continuation of ART 101 . Credit(s): 2

    Prerequisite(s): ART 101 
  
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    ART 200 Art Appreciation



    A survey of the principles of aesthetics as applied to painting, sculpture, architecture, ceramics and photography. Credit(s): 3

  
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    ART 214 Investigations in Modern Art



    Discussion of images and ideas, using slides of art works as subjects, tracing developments in Western art from Impressionism to the present. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ART 200 
  
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    ART 216 American Art



    An historical survey of American art from 1700 to the present. Credit(s): 3

  
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    ART 295 Topics



    Study of specific topics, issues or themes within the field of art. Credit(s): 3

  
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    ART 395 Topics



    Selected upper-level topics in art history. Credit(s): 3


Biology

  
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    BIO 105 The Natural World



    Intended for students not majoring in the natural sciences, BIO 105 surveys basic concepts of the life and earth sciences through class discussions, lab and field exercises and written assignments. Students also examine the nature of science, and gain insight into many of the societal implication of scientific knowledge. This course also forms part of a three-course series with PHYS 105  and CHEM 105 . Together the three courses provide an overview of the natural sciences and fulfill the requirements for Virginia state elementary (K-6) teacher licensure. The courses may be taken in any sequence. Three lecture hours plus two laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 105 The Natural World lab must be taken concurrently
  
  •  

    BIO 121 General Biology I



    General Biology is a two-course sequence that examines the ideas and methods basic to an understanding of contemporary biology. This first course focuses on the fundamental theories of biology, historically significant discoveries, classification of organisms, the chemical basis of life, cell biology and heredity. Three lecture hours plus three laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 121 General Biology I lab must be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 122 General Biology II



    General Biology is a two-course sequence that examines the ideas and methods basic to an understanding of contemporary biology. This second course focuses on the fundamentals of evolution, ecology, classification of organisms and basic plant and animal anatomy and physiology. Three lecture hours plus three laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): Earned a grade of “C-” or better in BIO 121 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 122 General Biology II lab must be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 201 Medical Terminology



    The relationship of word parts to their anatomic and physiologic counterparts will be learned in this course. Students will learn to combine appropriate word parts into complete medical terms, to interpret and explain clinical pathology reports, to interpret and explain clinical laboratory results and be able to use correct abbreviations and medical scribe notation. Accurate pronunciation and spelling of complete terms will be emphasized throughout the course. This course is designed to enhance student experiences in courses such as Human Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology or other clinically or medically relevant course. Three lecture hours per week. Credit(s): 3

  
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    BIO 220 Biotechnology: Methods and Applications



    This course is a laboratory-based exploration of modern scientific techniques used in biological and biomedical research. Laboratory exercises will include DNA and protein analysis, molecular cloning, protein expression and bioinformatics. Students will develop the skills necessary to design and execute complex experiments and analyze their results. The course will meet for five laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 2

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grade of “C-” or better in BIO 121 
  
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    BIO 231 Human Anatomy and Physiology I



    A course on the structure and function of the human organism. The central theme of homeostasis will be carried throughout. After studying the different structural levels of organization, cells and cellular activity are investigated, followed by the physiology of tissues, skin, bone and muscle. The integrative aspects of the nervous system and sensory organs complete the course. Three lecture hours plus three laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grade of “C-” or better in BIO 121 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 231 Anatomy and Physiology I lab must be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 232 Human Anatomy and Physiology II



    As a continuation of BIO 231 , the central theme of homeostasis will be carried throughout. This course begins with the integrative roles of the endocrine system. The cardiovascular system with all of its ramifications is investigated. Study of the maintenance systems of respiration, digestion, metabolism, excretion, body fluids and reproduction completes the course. Three lecture hours plus three laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grades of “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 231 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 232 Anatomy and Physiology II lab must be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 260 Microbiology



    The fundamental principles of the importance of microorganisms are presented in the course. Topics of course discussions will include the historical importance of microbiology, systematics, microbial metabolism, microbial genetics, biotechnology, pathogenesis, antimicrobial epidemiology and immunology. In addition to traditional learning tools, students will use a variety of multimedia and Internet-based technologies for classroom and laboratory learning experiences. The laboratory will introduce students to the basic techniques for growth and identification of microorganisms. Three lecture hours plus three laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grade of “C-” or better in BIO 121 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 260 Microbiology lab must be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 295 Topics



    This course addresses selected topics in biology for reading, discussion, writing, laboratory and field investigation. Credit(s): 2 to 4

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grade of “C-” or better in BIO 105  or BIO 121 
    Corequisite(s): Dependent upon topic, a concurrent Topics Lab may be required
  
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    BIO 316 Genetics



    In this course, basic principles of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetics are applied to the study of biological function at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels. Topics include how biological variation results from meiotic recombination, mutation and selection; chromosome structure and karyotype alterations; pedigree analysis; analysis of Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance patterns; population genetics; gene structure and expression; and epigenetics. Recitation will focus on genetics problem solving using concepts learned in lecture. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grades of “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 122 
    Corequisite(s): BIOR 316
  
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    BIO 320 Introduction to Neuroscience



    This course explores the function of the nervous system from the level of a single neuron to the interactions of large numbers of neurons in functional and dysfunctional systems. Emphasis will be placed on the electrophysiology and molecular biology of the neuron, sensory systems and the control of motor function. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 121  and BIO 122  or BIO 231 
  
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    BIO 321 Ecology



    Ecology is the study of the interrelationships between organisms and their physical and biological environments. The course will examine the various levels of ecology - populations, species, communities, and ecosystems - in lecture-discussions, laboratory studies and field investigations. Ecological concepts will be considered from various perspectives including theoretical predictions, laboratory experiments, observations, field measurements and resource management applications. Three lecture hours plus three laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 121  and BIO 121 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 321 Ecology lab must be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 322 Neuroscience of Motor Systems



    This course explores the control of motor behavior by the central nervous
    system. Various aspects of motor control will be explored at the level of the
    spinal cord, brainstem and cerebral cortex. Special emphasis will be placed on
    the coordination of motor and sensory systems in planning and executing motor
    tasks.  Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 231
  
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    BIO 325 Animal Behavior



    A study of the principles and mechanisms of animal behavior. Behavior will be viewed in a genetic, ecological, and evolutionary context. Three lecture hours plus three laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grades of “C-” or better in BIO 121  and BIO 122 , as well as one additional biology course above BIO 201 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 325 Animal Behavior lab must be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 330 Parasitology



    This course addresses the diversity of parasitism in the animal kingdom and provides an introduction to the general biology of parasitic protozoans, helminths,
    myxozoans and arthropods. With a focus on parasites of medical and veterinary importance, students will explore the ecology, life cycles, epidemiology,
    immunology and physiologic effects of these parasites in their vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Additionally, emphasis will be placed on the history of
    parasitic disease in human populations, allowing students to gain an understanding of the problems these organisms have caused in the past, how they were treated and controlled, and the role parasites may play in the future. BIOL 330 Parasitology lab must be taken concurrently. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grade of “C-” or better in BIO 121
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 330 Parasitology lab
  
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    BIO 332 Tropical Diseases



    This course addresses diseases common in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world at the cellular, individual and societal levels. Students will investigate
    the general biology, ecology, epidemiology, immunology, life cycles, physiologic effects and treatment of these diseases. Emphasis will be placed upon the
    diversity of pathogenic agents and the history of tropical diseases, including their control and treatment. Students will investigate how increasing human travel and our changing environmental landscape may affect the spread of disease in the future. BIO 260 is recommended, but not required for success in the course.
      Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grade of “C-” or better in BIO 121
  
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    BIO 340 Evolution



    This course examines the principles and mechanisms of evolutionary biology at all levels: molecular, organismal, population, species and above. Evolution will be examined from both historical and contemporary perspectives, but emphasis will be placed on the use and application of modern concepts and techniques to resolve evolutionary questions. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grades of “C-” or better in BIO 121 , BIO 122  and BIO 316 
  
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    BIO 344 Plant Morphology



    A survey of the evolution of plant forms, life cycles and functions from algae to angiosperms. The relationships between adaptive strategies - such as those for reproduction and dissemination - and the structures that pertain to those strategies will also be examined. Many class exercises will integrate morphology with other biological disciplines including taxonomy, evolution, genetics and ecology. In the laboratory and field, students will examine plant features useful in identification and classification. Three lecture hours plus three laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 121  and BIO 122  
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 344 Plant Morphology lab must be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 351 Vertebrate Zoology



    Vertebrate Zoology investigates the comparative anatomy, taxonomy, evolution, ecology and behavior of the Subphylum Vertebrata of the Phylum Chordata. The class will consider vertebrates from a variety of perspectives. Such an approach will integrate the various sub-specialties of the biological sciences such as genetics, morphology and systematics. Students are expected to come to field sessions prepared for outdoor work, including data collection, regardless of the weather. Field and laboratory studies will emphasize techniques for species identification as well as investigating population biology, morphology and adaptations. Three lecture plus three laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 121   and BIO 122 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 351 Vertebrate Zoology lab must be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 364 Pharmacology



    This course is a comprehensive introduction into the ways in which drugs move through and interact with our bodies in order to exert their intended effect. Interdisciplinary in nature, the course is designed to promote an understanding of how the chemical nature of the drug contributes to its ability to gain access to the targeted cell(s); elucidation of both general and specific cellular response patterns to drugs provide insight into common cellular signaling mechanisms that promote a change in the physiology of the organism. Three-hour lecture. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 121  and CHEM 122 
  
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    BIO 365 Diseases in History

    (same as HIST 365 )

    This course is an interdisciplinary topics course examining the impact of human disease on the development of human history. Topics to be discussed include: 1) fundamental information about different types of diseases, disorders, syndromes and disease processes; 2) an extensive review of significant points in history where either the illness and possible death of an individual leader or wide spread epidemics changed the course of human history; and 3) research papers and presentations by each student participating in the course. Diseases to be discussed include infectious diseases and genetic disorders. Three lecture hours per week. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grade of “C” or better in (BIO 121  or BIO 122 ) OR (HIST 101  or HIST 102 
  
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    BIO 395 Topics



    Selected topics in biology for reading, discussion, writing, laboratory and field investigation. Credit(s): 2 to 4

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 121  and BIO 122 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 395 Topics lab might be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 409 Cell Biology



    This course addresses the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Topics will include the synthesis and function of macromolecules, membranes and organelles; organization of cells into tissues; cellular signaling and communication; control of the cell cycle and division; and cancer. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grades of “C-” or better in BIO 121 , BIO 122 , CHEM 121  and CHEM 122 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 409
  
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    BIO 420 Developmental Biology



    This course is a study of gametogenesis, fertilization, cell type determination, histogenesis, organogenesis and the formation of the early body plan. Both molecular and organismal aspects of these processes will be discussed, and both a textbook and primary literature will be used. Model systems covered include invertebrate (fly, worm), vertebrate (chicken, frog, fish, mouse) and plant. In addition to gaining knowledge and analytical skills, students will receive extensive instruction on how to give both scientific journal article and research presentations. Laboratory will include observation of and experimentation with invertebrate, vertebrate and plant systems. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grade of “C-” or better in BIO 121 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 420
  
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    BIO 430 Histology



    This course explores the microscopic structure of tissues and organs of the body. The course will focus on the structural organization of cells, tissues and organs, as well as methods of visualization and how structure is related to function. This course will include both laboratory and lecture components. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 260 
  
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    BIO 465 Medical Microbiology



    A comprehensive course on infectious diseases, students learn how to correlate disease symptoms with laboratory findings, the types of specimens required for diagnosis, laboratory procedures to determine microorganism identity and drug susceptibility, current modes of treatment and any new technological advances used for identification and susceptibility testing in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Three lecture hours plus three laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grades of “C-” or better in microbiology at the 100 or 200 level (BIO 260 ), as well as in BIO 121  and BIO 122  or in BIO 231  and BIO 232 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 465 Medical Microbiology lab must be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 470 Endocrinology



    This course explores the anatomy and physiology of the human endocrine system. The regulation, synthesis and degradation of major hormones will be discussed. Interactions of hormones with their receptors and target cell responses will be covered in detail. Dysfunction of the endocrine system and resulting disorders will also be addressed. BIO 231  and BIO 232  are recommended, but not required for success in the course. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 121  Enrollment is limited to students with junior or senior standing
  
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    BIO 472 Immunology



    The study of the immune system including the importance of humoral and cell-mediated immunity in inflammation, infection, vaccination, hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, tumor formation and transplantation. This course is designed for students interested in health professions and health education. Three lecture hours plus three laboratory hours per week. Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): Earned grade of “C-” or better in BIO 232  or BIO 260 
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 472 Immunology lab must be taken concurrently
  
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    BIO 490 Clinical Internship



    Students interested in a career in clinical health professions must participate in a nationally accredited clinical internship that requires on-site training in the clinical discipline of their chosen profession. Examples of disciplines requiring clinical internships include the following: 1) clinical laboratory science (medical technology), 2) cytology (cytotechnology), 3) cytogenetics, 4) histology (histotechnology), 5) histocompatability technologist, 6) ultrasound technology, and 7) radiology (radiation technician, nuclear medicine technology). Credit(s): 1 to 12

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 121  and BIO 122 , BIO 260 , CHEM 121  and CHEM 122 , and junior or senior standing
  
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    BIO 491 Research Project



    Students will undertake a set of tasks or activities for a research project under the guidance and mentorship of a Biology Program faculty member. The research project will be of a specific and directed nature, and have a definable starting point and well defined objectives. Each task will have a planned completion date (due date) and assigned resources. The organization of the project will generally follow three major parts: planning, execution and completion. Planning and execution will be the focus of this semester activity. The assigned project tasks may encompass a wide variety of activities and may include working with microorganisms, plants, animals, field trips, laboratory procedures and experimentation. Credit(s): 2

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing
  
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    BIO 492 Research Project



    Students will undertake a set of tasks or activities for a research project under the guidance and mentorship of a Biology Program faculty member. The research project will be of a specific and directed nature and have a definable starting point and well defined objectives. Each task will have a planned completion date (due date) and assigned resources. The organization of the project will generally follow three major parts: planning, execution and completion. Execution and completion will be the focus of this semester activity. Completion of the project may include submission of a research paper with the findings suitable for publication in scientific journals, or presentation of project information at scientific symposia. The assigned project tasks may encompass a wide variety of activities and may include working with microorganisms, plants, animals, field trips, laboratory procedures and experimentation. Credit(s): 2

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing

Business Administration

  
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    BA 103 Introduction to Business



    The role of the business firm is studied together with its effect upon the economic and social environment. Emphasis is placed upon business principles and applications. This course may not be taken by business students who are juniors or seniors. Credit(s): 3

  
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    BA 107 Personal Finance



    Students learn to budget their finances, balance their checking accounts, and learn about taxes, banking, consumer credit, casualty and life insurance, investment markets, stock transactions, and retirement planning. This course may not be taken by business students who are juniors or seniors. Credit(s): 3

  
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    BA 112 Mind of the Entrepreneur



    Current issues and topics in entrepreneurship are examined via the most recent academic and practitioner printed and electronic media and sources. These issues and topics will be subjected to in-depth analysis in the class sessions and in individual written assignments. Credit(s): 3

  
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    BA 203 Statistics and Data Analysis for Business



    This course provides the student with an overview of some important analytical tools that are used to examine business phenomena and improve management decision-making. The two foci of attention are: 1) learning about the structure of analytical tools, namely exploratory data analysis, probability and statistics; and 2) learning how to use these tools to analyze business phenomena and improve business decision-making. In the process of conducting analyses of
    business phenomena, the student will focus special attention on one- and two-sample hypotheses testing; contingency-table analysis; simple linear regression;
    and analysis of variance. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 101  and IST 204   with a grade of C- or better

     

  
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    BA 211 Principles of Accounting I



    An introduction of the fundamentals of accounting which is a basic language of business. Journals, ledgers, adjusting entries and closing entries are introduced and utilized in building the financial and operating statements of sole proprietorships. Credit(s): 3

  
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    BA 212 Principles of Accounting II



    A continuation in the study of accounting fundamentals which covers accruals and deferrals, current liabilities, capital stock, investments and the preparation and analysis of financial statements including the statement of cash flows. The remaining topics will focus primarily on information for management decision-making including cost concepts, budgetary planning and control and responsibility accounting. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BA 211 
  
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    BA 302 Quantitative Methods



    This course provides the student with an overview of some of the quantitative (mathematically and statistically based) methods that are commonly used to support business decision-making. Course emphasis is on business applications - not on mathematics and statistics. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BA 203 
  
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    BA 303 Legal Environment of Business



    This course is a study of law as it applies to ordinary business situations with focus upon the Uniform Commercial Code dealing with obligations, contracts, agency and negotiable instruments. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Junior-level standing
  
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    BA 307 Introduction to Management and Organizational Behavior



    This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of management systems to include roles, ethical behavior, planning/strategy, structure/organization, leadership, control and change. In like manner, the behavioral aspects of individuals in organizations will be studied. These include improvement of individual, group and organizational behavior, including group dynamics. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): Junior-level standing
  
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    BA 310 Introduction to Management Information Systems and Electronic Commerce



    This course introduces the student to the concepts underlying the design, implementation, control and evaluation of a contemporary computer-based information system. Students will understand the role that management information systems play in the development of the Internet worked/e-commerce enterprise. The course strives to show how, through information systems, the manager is able to better understand today’s new business model. The course will emphasize the interrelationship between the three major business resources: information, information technology and people. This course is intended to provide the student with a major overview of the information function within the e-commerce enterprise. At all times, the emphasis will be on the application of technology to the business environment, with the intent of understanding how information technology has transformed how we live and work. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): IST 204  and junior-level standing
  
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    BA 311 Intermediate Accounting I



    The application of generally accepted accounting principles and the actions of FASB to the recording of financial data. A more sophisticated and detailed approach is demonstrated for income statement presentation and for classified statements of financial position. Additional topics include receivables, inventories, fixed assets and accounting applications of the time value of money. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BA 212 
  
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    BA 312 Intermediate Accounting II



    A continuation of the application of generally accepted accounting principles and the actions of FASB. Topics considered include income determination and valuation of intangible assets, current liabilities, long-term liabilities, short and long-term investments, tax deferrals, pension liabilities and long-term leases. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BA 311 
  
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    BA 315 Cost Accounting



    A study of the control and distribution of costs within manufacturing firms and the development of effective analytical tools of cost measurement in the planning and control of business operations. Topics include cost systems, standard costs, measurement and evaluation of quantity and quality variances, job cost identification, process cost identification, assignment of direct and indirect expenses, allocation of overhead expenses, flexible budgets, accounting for by-products, joint products, transfer pricing and the development of an effective system of cost accounting reports as a tool for utilization in management decision-making. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BA 212 
  
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    BA 322 Managerial Accounting



    The use of accounting data as an information system for recording and projecting the flow of funds through the firm, in determining the net results of the firm’s operation, that include budget comparison and analysis, and the evaluation of the performance of management. This is followed by analysis of the role of accounting information in aiding the management control system and the way in which such systems and incentives motivate people within an organization. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BA 212 
  
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    BA 325 Accounting and Finance for Entrepreneurs



    This course is designed for non-business majors who desire a fundamental understanding of the financing and accounting issues all businesses face. Specific attention is given to understanding a cash flow statement, income statement, statement of equity and balance sheet. The student is introduced to financing options, financial ratios and exposed to accounting tools that will help in managing a small business. May not be taken for credit with BA 330 . Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BA 112   or BA 103 
  
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    BA 330 Introduction to Finance



    An introduction to all aspects of corporate financial management, including the role of finance in a business organization; the role of financial markets and institutions; interpretation, analysis and forecasting of financial statements; time value of money; the consumption-investment decision; the various instruments of debt and equity; and valuation methods. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BSB junior-level standing
  
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    BA 337 Introduction to Healthcare Management



    An introductory course relating the concepts and functions of the manager to the specific realm of managing the health services delivery system. Credit(s): 3

  
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    BA 360 Introduction to Marketing



    Basic marketing functions, institutions, and concepts are studied with emphasis on the “4 Ps of Marketing,” which are involved in the creation, pricing, promotion, distribution, and sale of goods and services in industrial and consumer markets. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BSB junior-level standing (or BA 112  for minor in entrepreneurship)
  
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    BA 361 Marketing Research



    Introduction to the techniques, tools and applications of marketing research. Upon completion of this course, the student will have acquired the knowledge and skills needed to design proposals and marketing research studies, collect data using field and desk methods, analyze data using purposebuilt software, and report findings to aid decision-making - all according to established ethical guidelines.  Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BA 360  and BA 203  or equivalent
  
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    BA 362 Marketing Communications



    This course provides the marketing student with an in-depth understanding of all the communication tools available for the development and implementation of effective marketing strategies, including advertising, sales promotion, personal selling and publicity. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BA 360  and junior-level standing
  
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    BA 363 Consumer Behavior



    Study of activities related to both purchasing and consuming of goods and services together with behavioral and decision processes tied to such activities. Cognitive, affective, and behavioral factors, such as attitude, cognition, perception, learning, motivation, personality and shopping patterns are assessed in terms of their effects, e.g., on consumer relationships, brand preferences, product life-cycle, market posture and competitive advantage. Global thinking is emphasized together with understanding of cultural differences, ethical issues, cost-benefit analysis and marketing efficiency. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BA 360 
  
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    BA 380 Professional Selling



    This course covers sales principles and techniques that are necessary to become a successful salesperson. Students will learn and practice various selling skills through class readings, guest speakers, case studies, role-plays and oral presentations. Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): BA 360 
 

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